Perennial Flowers

60 Perennial Flowers

Hello, fellow gardener! Are you looking to establish some long-term flowers in your garden? If so, you’ll want to get to know all the perennials you can.

Perennials are any plants that naturally last more than two years. They will emerge and flower in the spring and come winter they will go dormant. What sets a perennial apart from an annual is that its roots stay alive during the winter and they will re-emerge again on their own when the conditions are right, you don’t need to re-plant.

The good news is that there are plenty of options to choose from when deciding which perennial flowers you want to incorporate into your garden. Take a look at these 60 examples and you’ll be sure to find some you love!

About Perennial Flowers

Incorporating perennials is ideal in a garden that you will be tending to long term. They can take longer than annuals to get established. This is old gardening saying explains the growth habit of perennials:

“The first year they sleep, the second year they creep, and the third year they leap”

-gardening saying

But they are so worth it! Think about it, a plant that will provide beautiful blooms every year, go dormant in the winter, and produce showy blooms again come spring, without you having to plant again.

Aster

perennial flowers: Aster

Aster is part of the daisy family, and there are around 200 species of Aster. The “New England” and “New York” varieties are among the most popular. You will get pink, blue, white, or purple blooms. Plant asters in zones 3-10 and expect blooms August through October, depending on the species. They can be planted spring through fall and will tolerate most soils. They will do their best in full sun.

African Daisy – Osteospermum

perennial flowers: African Daisy

As the name suggests, these beauties are also a part of the daisy family. What sets them apart is their two to three-toned blooms. They are hardy in zones 9-11. Plant these in well-draining soil in full sun. Expect them to reach 1-3 feet in height and width and enjoy blooms in summer, spring, and fall. Blooms will vary in color: orange, purple, pink, yellow, and white.

Agapanthus

Agapanthus

Also known as Lilie-of-the-Nile, this plant grows in clusters with dark green foliage from which tall stalks emerge, sporting a display of beautiful, clustered blue/purple flowers. Agapanthus will bloom from summer to early fall and can mature to heights of 4ft tall. They will do well in full sun or partial shade in zones 7-11.

Anchusa

Anchusa

Anchusa sports bright, tiny blue flowers from early spring through late summer. This plant does well in hot, dry climates and needs well-draining soil to thrive. It looks good in containers, as a border, or lining walkways. Plant Anchusa in zones 3-8.

Artichoke

Artichoke

While this perennial is considered a food, its outstanding periwinkle-hued blooms got it a place on this list. The artichoke that you are used to eating is actually the flower bud. If left on the plant, it will open into an eye-catching flower that will attract many pollinators. Artichoke plants will get 3-5 feet tall and can get just as wide. Look for blooms in late summer and early fall. Hardy to zones 7-11.

Amaranth

Amaranth

Amaranth is an edible as well as an ornamental short-lived perennial. The light green stocks can get up to 8 feet tall, and they produce showy, bright pink/red blooms that resemble a firework. Two common ornamental species are “Prince’s Feather” and “Joseph’s Coat”. Plant in full sun or partial shade and expect blooms in summer, fall, and early winter. Will do well in zones 2-11.

Baby’s Breath

Baby's Breath

Baby’s Breath sports small, delicate white blooms often found in flower arrangements. It is considered a long-lived perennial and grows in a mounded form, typically 2-3 feet wide. This perennial needs full sun and semi-dry soil conditions, in soggy soil they are prone to root rot. You will enjoy blooms from summer to fall. The plant will get 12-16 inches tall. Try using them as cut flowers in your own flower arrangement! Hardy in zones 3-9.

Bee Balm

Bee Balm

The beautiful Bee Balm plant will attract pollinators such as bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies to your garden. It sports blooms resembling daisies, commonly in shades of pink, red, purple, and white. Bee Balm prefers full sun in cooler climates but will do we in partial shade where summers get hot. They will grow to be 2.5 to 4 feet tall. Enjoy blooms all summer long! They will do we in zones 4-9.

Bergenia

Bergenia

Bergenia will make a great addition to your perennial flower garden with its broad green leaves and stunning petite clusters of pink blooms. It stays relatively small, reaching a height of 2 feet at full maturity. It’s a good stand-alone container plant, and also looks good used as a border. It will grow best in partial shade or full sun in loamy soil, but can also thrive in clay-type soils. Look for pink, red, or white blooms in April and May. Plant in zones 4-8.

Black Eyed Susan

Black Eyed Susan

These California native wildflowers will catch your eye every time, and make you smile. They sport medium-sized daisy-like blooms, with a black “eye” at the center. Note that not all varieties are perennials. Two common perennial varieties include Sweet Black-eyed Susans and Goldstrum. These bright yellow flowers thrive in full sun, but will also tolerate partial shade. They will reach from 18-24 inches in height and sport their blooms from June to October. Hardy in zones 4-9.

Butterfly Weed

Butterfly Weed

You probably guessed right, the Butterly Weed flower is loved by butterflies! Growing 1-2 feet tall and sporting clusters of orange/yellow blooms from May to September, this is a must in your perennial garden. They do best planted in well-draining, sandy-type soil in full sun. They can tolerate drought and do best in zones 3-9.

Calendula

Calendula

Calendula is considered a short-lived perennial, meaning it will keep coming back from just a few years. Planted densely, or in containers, they add pops of bright yellow and orange, with daisy-like blooms. They stay small, reaching 1 foot in height at maturity. Plant Calendulas in full sun or part shade in zones 9-11.

California Poppy

California Poppy

Known as California’s state flower, these are sure to catch your eye every time with light green foliage and delicate, cupped orange blooms. Look for blooms from late spring to early fall, and deadhead consistently to encourage more blooms. Plant in full sun or partial shade in well-draining sand-like soil. Most common poppies sport orange flowers but keep your eye out for other varieties that offer red, orange, or pink blooms. Hardy from zones 2-11.

Carnation

Carnation

Carnations are recognizable due to their popularity in being used commercially as a cut flowers. They are hardy from zones 7-10, where they behave as short-lived perennials. Plant them in full sun or partial shade and enjoy their classic pink blooms in spring.

Catmint

Catmint

This charming plant has a small, bushy growth habit making it ideal for borders and group planting. They can also behave as an insect deterrent near vegetable gardens. Catmint has gray-green foliage that hosts clusters of purple flowers. This is a drought-tolerant plant that will do well in full sun or partial shade. Note that it is an herb that can be used for culinary or medicinal purposes. Hardy to zones 4-8.

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemums, or mums, are known for their ability to add beautiful swaths of color to your garden. Choose from a wide variety of varieties that sport purple, red, white, yellow, and orange daisy-like bloom. They grow in small mounds, making them good for borders. You can plant mums in full sun in zones 5-9 and expect blooms from September until your first winter frost.

Crocosmia Lucifer

Crocosmia Lucifer

While it may not roll off the tongue, Crocosmia Lucifer will add beauty and attract beneficial pollinators to your garden. They sport red flowers on arching stems emerging from beautiful thin, light green foliage. They will mature to a height of 30-35 inches and bloom from mid to late summer. Plant bulbs in full sun and well-draining soil for best results. Perennial in zones 5-9.

Dahlia

Dahlia

Dahlias offer stunning blooms from summer to autumn. If you haven’t grown Dahlias before, you may be surprised to know that they are grown from tubers, planted in the spring. While common varieties showcase blooms 4-6 inches in diameter, some varieties produce blooms as small as 2-inches and as big as 15 inches. Note that they will only overwinter in zones 8-11, in zones 2-7 tubers must be dug up and replanted in the spring.

Daffodil

Daffodil

Daffodils over beautiful yellow, white, and cream blooms that you can smell from a mile away. Their scent is captivating. If you want to add these beauties to your garden, plant bulbs in the fall and expect blooms the following spring. Make sure to plant them where they will get full sun. They are winter hardy in zones 3-8.

Delphinium

Delphinium

Delphiniums are a must if you want your garden to stand out. They grow upright, “flower spikes” that can grow from 2- 6 feet tall. Common varieties sport blue blooms but some varieties offer blooms in shades of pink, red white, and yellow. Plant in partial shade, allowing them to get morning sun and a break in the shade in afternoons. Look out for blooms in early summer and again in early fall. Plant in zones 3-7.

Echinacea

Echinacea

Also known as coneflower, Echinacea is a great, low-maintenance addition to your perennial flower garden. They sport simple pink blooms from June to September. They will thrive in full sun or partial shade in warmer climates. Depending on the variety you choose, expect the plant to grow from 2-5 feet tall. They are drought and deer resistant and can be grown in zones 3-9.

Erysimum

Erysimum

This plant is a good addition to garden beds and borders. In mild winter areas, it is considered evergreen. The attractive foliage holds upright clusters of tiny, bright flowers. It matures to heights of 24-30 inches and will spread about 20 inches wide. Hardy to zones 6-9. Enjoy these showy blooms in spring, summer, and fall.

Feverfew

perennial flowers: Feverfew

Feverfew is a type of chrysanthemum and has been used as a medicinal herb for centuries. They grow in bush-like mounds that reach about 20 inches in height. They sport small 6-pedaled white flowers with a bright yellow center. They can grow in most soil conditions but prefer loamy soil and lots of sun. Look out for blooms between July and October. Short-live perennial in zones 5-9.

Forsythia

Forsythia

Forsythia is actually a shrub that belongs to the olive family, but its brilliant yellow flowers landed it a spot on this list. Note that depending on the variety, shrubs can grow to be anywhere from 2-10 feet tall. Use Forsythia as a border or a centerpiece in your garden and watch bees and butterflies come for a visit. They will do best in well-draining soil in full sun. Enjoy the bright yellow blooms in the spring in zones 5-8.

Forget-Me-Not

Perennial flowers: Forget-Me-Not

Forget-Me-Nots make an excellent border but will look good just about anywhere. They reach a maximum height of 2 feet and display beautiful, small blue blooms with a yellow center that bloom from May through October. These plants like moisture, humidity, and shade. They can adapt to full sun, but they will need adequate water. Plant Forget-Me-Nots in zones 3-8.

Freesia

Freesia

Freesias grow similarly to orchids, in that they have a long stem with flower buds along the length of it. Enjoy successive blooms in the spring for about six weeks. Freesias can be used as an indoor plant as well, they reach a maximum height of 24 inches. There are many hybrids and color options including white, yellow, orange, pink, and blue. They make good cut flowers and are pleasantly fragrant. Enjoy Freesias in your garden in zones 9 and 10.

Fucshia

Perennial flowers: Fucshia

Fucshias are loved by gardeners for their versatileness, with hundreds of species and colors to choose from. They can grow to be tall and bushy, low and sprawling like a ground cover, or grown vining up a trellis. Fucshias are sensitive to hot temperatures over 85F so be sure to place them in a semi-shaded area if you’re in a warmer climate. They will start to bloom in the spring. Note that Fucshias are only perennials in the warmer zones 9 and 10, anywhere colder they will not overwinter.

Geranium

perennial flowers: Geranium

Another zone-specific perennial, Geraniums will do well in zones 9 and 10, any colder climates will require that you bring your Geranium indoors during the winter. They have a long blooming season that starts in spring and sustains until mid-fall. Common varieties sport red, pink, or coral-colored blooms on a medium-length stem that is perfect for use in a flower arrangement. The foliage is also beautiful. Common varieties grow to 2-4 feet tall and wide.

Gladioulus

Gladioulus

Gladiolus is a stand-out flower to add to your landscape. Grown from a bulb, they have long, blade-like foliage from which tall stalks of richly colored flowers emerge. Gladiolus come in all colors of the rainbow, common choices are red, white, and pink. They do make excellent cut flowers, although they do not have a scent. They are hardy in zones 8-10. Plant them in good draining soil in full sun and enjoy their fabulous blooms all summer long.

Goldenrod

Goldenrod

If you’re looking to add an eye-catching plant to your landscape, Goldenrod is an excellent choice. This plant has dense green foliage that grows tall and slender and sports plumes of bright yellow flowers at the tip. Goldenrod will tolerate most soils, just make sure it’s in full sun. Hardy in zones 3-9.

Hibiscus

Hibiscus

If you’ve ever been to Hawaii, then you have likely seen the beauty of the Hibiscus flower. Being a tropical plant they do not tolerate cold temperatures (anything below 32F). If you live in a colder climate, consider planting your hibiscus in a pot or container, so that you can move it inside during the winter. They are hardy in zones 5-10. Hibiscus sport big, bicolor blooms on a backdrop of dark green leaves. Typical colors for the flowers include pink, orange, red, and white.

Hyacinth

Hyacinth

Hyacinth is another stand-out flower. Similar to gladiolus they grow from a bulb and sport dark green blade-shaped foliage from which a tall flower stock emerges, they typically get 8-10inches tall. They are available in a rainbow of colors. Not only are they visually pleasing, but they also have an extremely strong and pleasant scent as well. They will be one of your first flowers to bloom in the spring. They are hardy in zones 4-8.

Hollyhock

Hollyhock

Hollyhocks will likely be the tallest flowering perennial in your garden. They stand proudly at 4-6 feet tall, sporting beautiful white, pink, or red blooms along their stock. Note that Hollyhock will stay dormant during the first year it is planted and will emerge in the second year. They do well planted in well-draining soils but can handle clay-like soil. They prefer full sun. Considered a short-lived perennial in zones 3-9.

Iris

Iris

Iris is a classic garden plant, looking especially good along walkways or used as a border. They grow from a bulb, have tall, thin, pointed foliage, and sport intricate ruffled blooms. Available in a rainbow of colors and typically reach a height of 1-2 feet tall, with dwarf varieties available as well. Give them full sun, and they will produce showy blooms in spring or summer, variety dependant. Hardy in zones 4-9.

Ice Plant

Ice Plant

Ice Plants will add a very bright, eye-catching splash of color to your garden. It is commonly used as a groundcover due to its low, sprawling growth habit. One plant will sprawl out about 2-4 feet. Technically a succulent, it thrives in dry, sandy-type soil. Too much water could damage the plant. Plant in full sun and enjoy blooms in the summer and fall.

Jasmine

Jasmine

Known for its intoxicating, sweet scent, Jasmine is an excellent addition to a garden. Note that it is a shrub and can grow to be 15 feet tall. Consider this when choosing a planting site. They do well growing along fences or up a trellis. They will do best in full sun or partial shade in well-draining, fertile soil. Enjoy their fragrant, small white blooms in the spring. Does best in zones 7-10.

Kniphofia

Kniphofia

Also known as Red Hot Poker, this plant will be the wildest-looking plant in your landscape. They grow in clusters of tall grass-like foliage from which tall stalks emerge, supporting large blooms that resemble a torch. The flowers have an ombre look, fading between orange, red, and yellow. This plant prefers loamy/sandy soil and full sun. They can reach heights of up to 6 feet tall. Hardy in zones 5-9.

Lantana

Lantana

Lantana is a small, evergreen shrub that adds a delightful burst of color wherever they are planted. The shrub will mature to a height and width of 4-6 feet. Choose a planting site with full sun and well-draining soil to keep this plant happy. Note that they will only behave as perennials in zones 8-10. They can be grown as annuals in all other zones. They sport small clusters comprised of tiny, brightly colored flowers. Most common varieties come in red, orange, yellow, pink, and white. You can enjoy these blooms year-round in frost-free climates!

Lavender

Lavender

Lavender plants offer a lovely scent, a splash of color, and attract pollinators. They grow in compact shrubs, sporting upright spikes of light to dark purple flowers. These blooms can be enjoyed from summer to fall and have a lovely scent. Lavender likes full sun and dry soil conditions once established. Expect your plant to get 2-3 feet in height. Lavender thrives in zones 5-9.

Lilac

Lilac

Lilacs are a true joy to have in your garden. They are small-medium-sized shrubs, maturing to heights of 5-15ft tall. They produce clusters of strong-scented blooms that emerge for 2-4 weeks in the spring. They need full sun and rich soil to produce their best blooms. They are hardy in zones 2-7.

Lupin

Lilac

Lupin, a well-known wildflower, can be brought right into your own garden. They produce showy, upright spikes of white, pink, yellow, orange, or purple blooms. Each plant will mature to a size of about 3 feet tall and 1.5 feet wide. They bloom in the spring and summer and are hardy to zones 4-8.

Monks Hood

Monks Hood

Monkshood is a wildflower commonly seen in the northern hemisphere. They produce an up-right stock of purple-hued flowers during the summer. They grow 2-4 feet tall and do well as a background plant. They prefer full sun but will tolerate partial shade. Monkshood will do best in zones 3-7. In hotter climates, make sure they get afternoon shade.

Nasturtium

Nasturtium

Nasturtium is a perennial in zones 9-11. They have a sprawling/vining growth habit; one plant can mature to 6ft in width. They have leaves that resemble small lily pads and dazzling bright blooms, commonly in red and orange. Note that their flowers and leaves are edible, they have a mild pepper taste make a visually pleasing addition to salads. Nasturtiums are known to do well in poor soils but do need full sun for prolific blooms.

Passion Flower

Passion Flower

Passion Flower is a prolific tropical vining plant. They produce dazzling, intricate purple/white flowers that attract pollinators and have a delightful fragrance. Being a tropical plant, they will do best in the warmer climates of zones 7-10 and need to be planted in full sun. Enjoy blooms throughout the summer and into early fall.

Pearl Bush

Pearl Bush

Part of the rose family, this long-blooming shrub makes a great border. The dark green foliage is a backdrop for delicate, pure white flowers. Plant Pearl Bush in full sun or partial shade for best results. This shrub can get quite big, 5-8 feet tall. Hardy in zones 4-8.

Hairy Beard Tongue

Hairy Beard Tongue

Also known as Hairy Penstemon, these plants provide trumpet-shaped blooms for 6-8 weeks in spring and summer. They will tolerate partial shade but do best in full sun. The plant will grow to be 16-24 inches in height and will attract many bees. Hardy in zones 3-9.

Heather

Heather

Heather is commonly used as a low-growing ground cover. Heather comes in many varieties, each having a different size and color. This plant will do best in loamy or sandy soils and will not tolerate high winds. Enjoy bloom from summer to mid-fall. Hardy in zones 4-7

Pincushion Flower

Pincushion Flower

The Pincushion plant is an easy-to-grow perennial in zones 3-7. They offer prolific blooms in pleasant pink and purple hues which will emerge in the summer and last until early fall. One plant can reach a mature size of 12-18 inches tall and wide. Plant in full sun.

Primrose

Primrose

Primrose plants are very common and can be found easily at plant nurseries. They do well in containers or used as a border. They stay relatively small, reaching heights of 6-18 inches tall. Primrose can thrive in shaded areas. Virtually all colors are available and you can enjoy blooms in the springtime. They are hardy in zones 4-8

Queen Anne’s Lace

Queen Anne's Lace

Queen Anne’s Lace is a flowering herb in the carrot family. They will add a more “wild” look where planted. The foliage resembles that of the common carrot and their blooms are clusters of tiny white flowers that can be seen from spring through fall. Queen Anne’s Lace will get tall, up to 3 ft. This plant will thrive in zones 3-9.

Rose Mallow

Rose Mallow

Rose Mallow is in the Hibiscus family and is commonly used as a border due to its tall and narrow growth habit. The blooms get huge, up to 12 inches in diameter in some varieties, and are commonly found in different shades of red and pink. This plant likes full sun and even moisture. It will do best in zones 4-9. To reach the flowering stage successfully Rose Mallow needs long, hot summer conditions.

Salvia

Salvia

Your perennial flower garden is not complete without this classic. They produce long stems of up-right blooms that attract pollinators and last from summer through early fall. They prefer full sun and are drought-tolerant, making them a low-maintenance plant. They look good planted in groups but keep in mind, depending on the variety, one plant can reach a maturity of 3 feet tall and wide. Plant salvia in zones 5-10.

Sedum

Sedum

Sedums are easy-to-grow perennials with succulent type leaves and clusters of tiny, star-burst flowers. The two main categories are low-growing and upright, creating a wide variety of uses in different designs. Sedums will tolerate partial shade but will do best in full sun. They can also tolerate a wide variety of soil conditions. Enjoy their blooms from mid-summer to late fall in zones 4-9.

Shasta Daisy

Shasta Daisy

Shasta Daisy’s offer the best of both worlds; bright summer blooms and evergreen foliage to last year-round. Depending on the cultivar, they can reach heights of 3 ft or stay low at 8 cm tall. Fill any bare spots with this cheery plant, making sure it gets full sun and is planted in well-draining soil. This plant will do best in zones 4-9.

Sea Pink

Sea Pink

Sea Pink is a small, slow-growing perennial. They grow in clusters and shoot up wiry stems that sport round, papery flowers which can be seen from late spring to early summer. Sea Pinks stay small, reaching heights of 6-12 inches tall. They prefer full sun in northern climates but will need part shade in the hotter, southern climates. This plant can tolerate poor soils and is hardy in zones 4-8.

Tickseed

Tickseed

Tickseed is a prolific bloomer, prized for its daisy-like flowers that are gold, yellow, orange, or red. They grow in clumps reaching heights of up to 48in or staying small at 6in, depending on the variety. Enjoy their blooms from early summer to fall. This plant is considered low-maintenance and can be grown in zones 3-10.

Toad Lilly

Toad Lilly

Toad Lilly is known for its showy, star-shaped, spotted flowers. Hardy to zones 4-9, these blooms can be enjoyed in the fall. This is a shade-loving plant, especially in hotter climates. Just make sure to keep the soil around Toad Lillys evenly moist.

Tuberose

Perennial flowers: Tuberose

This plant offers a strong, pleasant scent on tall flower spikes that grow from an attractive cluster of tall, slender foliage. Blooms will emerge in the summer and sustain until fall. Tuberose will thrive in full to partial sun in zones 9-11.

Viburnum

perennial flowers: Viburnum

Viburnum is a showy, prolifically blooming shrub. In some varieties the flowers are fragrant, and most bloom in the spring. In the fall after flowering ornamental fruits emerge. Viburnum can grow in any soil type as long as it is fertile, and prefers full sun to partial shade. They are hardy from zones 4-8.

Yarrow

Yarrow

Once established, Yarrow will be one of the lowest maintenance plants in your garden. A California native, it thrives in full sun and dry soil conditions, making it an excellent choice for a drought-affected landscape. Yarrow has soft, light green fern-like foliage and dense, clustered blooms comprised of tiny flowers. Common yarrow comes in white, yellow, and pink. Pant in zones 3-9 and enjoy blooms in the spring and summer. Good cut flower.